NW Flower and Garden show Unofficial Judge

2017 NW Flower and Garden Show
Food in the Garden was the theme.  We helped Dakara Designs implement the Silver-Medal winning design, “A Victory Garden”, that interspersed edibles amongst the ornamentals Check out some photos and updates at facebook.com/eatyouryard

Unfortunately, we snoozed on getting our application in to be the primary designer.  It is a good thing for the rest of the designers, because had we done so, we would have stolen the show with a 100% edible city!    Oh well, next time the NW Flower and Garden Show wants to be cool and relevant again, we’ll be there. Anyhow, come check out the show for the various ways to incorporate food into your garden.

During the wild build out (3 days to build what could normally take 1-2 weeks, with large machinery and forklifts zipping on by us) I realized that we should not be helping another designer build a garden, we should be one of the judges of the show. Through our almost 10 years, we have incorporated food growing plants into a variety of situations, from dozens and dozens of vegetable gardens tiny porch gardens, rooftop gardens, food forests, huge permaculture installations, using food plants interspersed with ornamentals (although we believe that is an arbitrary line).  We have used over 250+ varieties of vegetables, herbs, perennial-edibles, berry bushes, fruit trees, vines, natives to qualify us for the unofficial judge. Plus we are Certified Awesome!  Show gardens are fictitious, and do not necessarily have a base in reality with spacing of plants, siting of plants, and most obviously bloom time.  It is still amazing to see what people envision over the course of 6-12 months, and build in a matter of days.

So anyway,  I will be finally doing a thorough walk through discussing the Gardens

They are so diverse, so I will be honoring up the 2-3 I think did the best job at incorporating food. Here’s the Gardens we liked and why. I am disqualifying ours from the conversation for now since I am biased.  I’ll finalize things by Sunday afternoon.

  1. “Honey I Shrunk The Farm”.  Designer: Farmer Frog  Showing you can generate a lot of food in a small space, introducting the public to aquaponics and high  tunnel greenhouses.
  2.  “Nourrir Les Espirits” Nourishing the Spirits.  Designed by Treeline Designz and Calluna’s Garden. Incorporating some beautifully pruned peach trees into a hardscape. (more notes to come
  3. Anyone that did an outdoor kitchen with herbs around. There were four of these, so if you want to know more, come check out the show.

NOTE: I will be editing this with more notes from various gardens at the show as I walk around.

  • Espaliered Trees
  • Herb ground covers
  • Mixing in Edibles
  • Fruit tree-blocks (groups of similar trees)
  • Pruning Trees into cool shapes
  • Aquaponic production
  • vegetable garden production

 

 

 

Parking Day

This parklet is a series of raised bed rain gardens fed with water by a pedal-powered pump. Students at University of Washington’s school of Lanscape Architecture put it together, and CEL loaned the rain garden plants for it, including the following edibles: Evergreen Huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum, Elderberry (Sambucas nigra), blueberry, salal (Gaultheria shallon), and High Bush Cranberry (Viburnum opulus)
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Pest Management

lacewing

This global climate chaos is affecting many of us including growing food. Insects that used to get knocked back by winter, are coming in stronger.
Farmers and home gardeners alike have pests, and we thought you might be interested in some tactics to preserve your veggies.

There are many beneficial insects, such as the green lacewing above. So please dont just assume all bugs are bad!

Here is a great link from WSU extension, whom we love.

http://gardening.wsu.edu/pest-management/

companion planting (click link) and
Crop rotations will help with soil health, thus providing you with healthier plants more resistant to bugs.

Speaking of soil. I heard last year that there are over 2000 types of soils in the world. We have some nice stuff here in the NW, but it varies quite a bit for sure.
Soil tests from King County Conservation District, which is for nutrients only. 5 Free per household per lifetime
Soil test from U-Mass, which is more comprehensive.
Fruit Tree Guilds-help create better environments for beneficials, and include insectary plants.

Contact us if you would like some cloche fabric. We have about a mile!

Back at the Farmers Markets

Hello,
We are happy that we are back at the farmers markets circuit starting in a few weeks.
We’ll be at the U-District Farmers market on Saturday, from 9-2pm, and West Seattle on Sundays from 10-2pm.
We may also go to Ballard. Stay tune for an update in that regard.
We’ll have starts, perennial plants, berries, bamboo, and some trees.
We’ll also have some nice pots, vertical garden options, and other fun garden art.
Hope to see you all there!


Up-Coming Markets

We are at markets in the North and South, East and West ends of Seattle, with guest appearances in Mercer Island, Redmond and elsewhere. Look here for the most up-to-date information on where to find us week to week. 

This Weekend 

Saturday, April 30th
9 am – 2 pm University District Farmer’s Market.
Near the South end of the market (closer to 50th)

Sunday, May 1st
10 am – 2 pm West Seattle Farmer’s Market.
Near the North end of the market (Closer to California Ave)

10 am – 3 pm Ballard Farmer’s Market
We are at a different spot each week. Check out facebook Sunday Morning for an update

Next Week

Wednesday, May 4

3 pm – 7 pm Columbia City Farmer’s Market
Market opening! 37th Ave S & S Edmunds St, just off Rainier Ave S.

Saturday, May 7th 
9 am – 2 pm University District Farmer’s Market.
Near the South end of the market (closer to 50th)

9 am – 4 pm Master Gardener Plant Sale
UW Center for Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St., Seattle 98105

10 am – 3 pm Orca Plant Sale
5215 46th Ave S, Seattle WA 98118

Sunday, May 8th
10 am – 2 pm West Seattle Farmer’s Market.
Near the North end of the market (Closer to California Ave)

10 am – 3 pm Ballard Farmer’s Market
We are at a different spot each week. Check out facebook Sunday Morning for an update

11 am – 3 pm Master Gardener Plant Sale
UW Center for Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St., Seattle 98105

The Week After Next

Wednesday, May 11
3 pm – 7 pm Columbia City Farmer’s Market
37th Ave S & S Edmunds St, just off Rainier Ave S.

Saturday, May 14th
9 am – 2 pm University District Farmer’s Market
Near the South end of the market (closer to 50th)

10 am – 2 pm Big Chickie BARNRAISER LAUNCH PARTY AND PLANT SALE!!!!!!!
Official launch count down and sparkly drink toast at high noon!
5520 Rainier Ave S.Seattle, WA 98118

Sunday, May 15th
10 am – 2 pm West Seattle Farmer’s Market.
Near the North end of the market (Closer to California Ave)

10 am – 2 pm Salt Box Designs BARNRAISER LAUNCH PARTY AND PLANT SALE!!!!!!!
North-End Party and Celebration. Official 24 hour update and sparkly drink toast at high noon!
6256 3rd Ave NW, Seattle 98107


In Three Weeks

Wednesday, May 18
3 pm – 7 pm Columbia City Farmer’s Market
37th Ave S & S Edmunds St, just off Rainier Ave S.

Saturday, May 21st
No University District Farmer’s Market
Due to the University Street Fair Cascadia Edible Landscapes will not be at market

Sunday, May 22nd
10 am – 2 pm West Seattle Farmer’s Market.
Near the North end of the market (Closer to California Ave)

10 am – 3 pm Ballard Farmer’s Market
We are at a different spot each week. Check out facebook Sunday Morning for an update

Prepping soil for Spring crops in the NW

In an ideal world, you would have covered cropped in the Fall.
If you did this, you want to till or chop in the “green manure” in the cover crop in February before it goes to seed.

If you did not, then you can still add in compost. Depending on your soil type, tilling it in may be necessary or not. If you have heavy clay soil, the compost helps create air pockets, so it is good to till in. If you already have decent soil, you can top dress and let it get worked in over the coming year.

It is also good to test the pH of your soil. An ideal pH for a veggie garden is 6.0-6.5. If your pH is less than this, then it is good to use dolomite/agricultural lime, available at most garden stores (you can grab from us at Farmers Markets in March).

C